FYI—-FBI


Welcome to IC3

The Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) is a partnership between the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the National White Collar Crime Center (NW3C),
and the Bureau of Justice Assistance
(BJA).

IC3’s mission is to serve as a vehicle to receive, develop, and refer criminal complaints
regarding the rapidly expanding arena of cyber crime. The IC3 gives the victims
of cyber crime a convenient and easy-to-use reporting mechanism that alerts authorities
of suspected criminal or civil violations. For law enforcement and regulatory agencies
at the federal, state, local and international level, IC3 provides a central referral
mechanism for complaints involving Internet related crimes.
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Filing a Complaint with IC3

IC3 accepts online Internet crime complaints from either the person who believes
they were defrauded or from a third party to the complainant. We can best process
your complaint if we receive accurate and complete information from you. Therefore,
we request that you provide the following information when filing a complaint:

* Your name
* Your mailing address
* Your telephone number
* The name, address, telephone number, and Web address, if available, of the individual
or organization you believe defrauded you.
* Specific details on how, why, and when you believe you were defrauded.
* Any other relevant information you believe is necessary to support your complaint.

Thank you for filing a complaint with the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3).

Your complaint has been successfully submitted. Please retain the following information for future contacts with the IC3:

Complaint Id: Iwerjlo2880707
Password: 082380855-92232

If you wish to view/download your complaint or have any additional information to provide to the IC3, please use the following link and login with the above complaint id and password.
http://complaint.ic3.gov/update

The IC3’s mission is to serve as a vehicle to receive, develop, and refer criminal complaints regarding the rapidly expanding arena of cyber crime. The IC3 aims to give the victims of cyber crime a convenient and easy-to-use reporting mechanism.

BTW…

Cyber-bullying (predominantly spelled cyberbullying by many researchers) is when someone repeatedly makes fun of another person online or repeatedly picks on another person through emails or text messages, or uses online forums and postings online intended to harm, damage, humiliate or isolate another person that they don’t like.[2]

The National Crime Prevention Council criterion of what constitutes cyber-bullying is “when the Internet, cell phones, or other devices are used to send or post text or images intended to hurt or embarrass another person.”[3]

Online bullying, called cyberbullying, happens when teens use the Internet, cell phones, or other devices to send or post text or images intended to hurt or embarrass another person. Cyberbullying researchers Hinduja and Patchin define cyber-bullying as: “willful and repeated harm inflicted through the medium of electronic text”[4] and recently updated the definition to account for cyberbullying through the internet that occurs without actual text, such as videos being uploaded to YouTube, for example.

The updated definition as awareness of the phenomenon increases is: “the intentional and repeated harm of others through the use of computers, cell phones, and other electronic devices.”[5]

Cyber-bullying can be as simple as continuing to send e-mail to someone who has said they want no further contact with the sender, but it may also include threats, sexual remarks, pejorative labels (i.e., hate speech), ganging up on victims by making them the subject of ridicule in forums, and posting false statements gossip as fact aimed at humiliation.

Cyber-bullies may disclose victims’ personal data (e.g.m real name, address, or workplace/schools) at websites or forums or may pose as the identity of a victim for the purpose of publishing material in their name that defames or ridicules them. Some cyberbullies may also send threatening and harassing emails and instant messages to the victims, while other post rumors or gossip and instigate others to dislike and gang up on the target.

Though the use of sexual remarks and threats are sometimes present in cyber-bullying, it is not the same as sexual harassment and does not necessarily involve sexual predators.

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